Friday, September 4, 2015

More Scattered Thoughts

It’s not easy putting a harness on hatred and the lust for revenge, Jesus ain’t gonna do it.

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Said the Stone to the Earth, I would fly if I could.

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What if you wanted not just allusions to Thales’ “The world is full of gods” and Nietzsche’s Will to Power but also to link the two as well as providing an example for a theory of causality in one short sentence? English lacks a handy equivalent to German’s “die Vieldeutig.”

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You’re not living in a post-Christian world, if the whole idea of Truth doesn’t occasionally strike you as an exotic curiosity.

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Starting around the time of Descartes, the idea that the world is godless began to take shape. Thinkers avoided this accursed abyss of an idea. Some made believe that this abyss wasn’t there. Some constructed fences around it to prevent the unwary from falling into it. It wasn’t until Nietzsche that anyone was either brave enough or foolish enough to jump in feet first to have a look around and see what all the fuss was about.

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A logical argument is unpersuasive, especially in matters of eternal importance. Undiscovered fallacies are always possible. Smell, excuse me, faith is much more persuasive. We are social animals. For a long time bathing was looked upon as something dangerous, only to be done in the most dire of circumstances.

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The present is the culmination of the past and the raw material of the future.

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After unpleasant but unexpected consequences of an action, the guilty party often says imploringly to his victim, “I didn’t mean to.” Why is that not heard after a pleasant but unexpected consequence? Surely accidents are just as likely to be one as the other. “I didn’t mean to” is code for a petty vain worship of success coupled to a cowardly shameful fear of failure. If even the most scrupulous ascetic practicing akarman rigorously cannot control the consequences of his non-action, how are lowly mortals going to?

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Sometimes I think creativity is simply misunderstanding what everyone else is doing and saying. It is on occasion a species f error. 

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Mistakes and ignorance are an important part of life and are unjustly ignored. Even Christianity recognizes this with its absurdly overwrought warnings of the dangers of an infelicitous error in Eternal Matters and the great importance it places on winning souls for Christ. Now that finding truth has once again become hard profane work without any likelihood of it falling out of the sky, error is omnipresent in our lives as the mother of truth. 

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